Lighting of the Tunnel at Natural Tunnel State Park

16566789476_523e564aa7_oThe Lighting of the Tunnel programs at Natural Tunnel State Park are set to begin the Friday after Thanksgiving and continue every Friday and Saturday evening until January 1st and 2nd, with the exception of Christmas day and the day after.

While you’re at the park remember to stop by the Carter Cabin. The cabin is the oldest standing structure in Scott County, VA. It has been relocated from it’s original location but is still in wonderful condition. The DBWTA will have interpreters in the Carter Cabin during each Lighting of the Tunnel program discussing local history and the Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail.

For more information about the program here is a link to the flyer.

Apple Brown Betty in a Pumpkin – recipe

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4 cups large day old bread crumbs(French or Italian Bread Best)
1/2 cup melted butter
3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Pinch of Salt
3/4 cup brown sugar
4 cups chopped cooking apple slice thin or seasonal fruits
1 cup of raisins
1/4 lb. Butter and Brown Sugar
Optional: ½ cup of apple cider (this would just give it a little more moisture and taste. I do this.)
1 cup of finely chopped pecans or walnuts
Cut whole in top of pumpkin large enough to stick hand in to clean out seeds and strings. Clean out the seeds and some of the pumpkin(not too deep). The pumpkin which is taken out can be chopped up and put back into the mix. Clean out seeds and save to roast later if you like.
*(Seeds saved to be roasted must be washed and cleaned then dried of water. Mix 1/2 cup of olive oil, 1/8 lb. butter, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1/2 teaspoon pepper, and 1/2 teaspoon of red pepper to season and mix with the pumpkin seeds. Spread seasoned seeds onto a cast iron or metal sheet to either bake in the brick oven or fry in a pan until roasted.)
Combine bread crumbs with butter, cinnamon, salt, brown sugar, and toss lightly.
Put layers of bread crumbs, apples, pumpkin, raisins, nuts, butter(cut into patties) and sugar, alternating until pumpkin is filled. Top with Butter and Brown Sugar.
Make a bed of very warm ash to place the pumpkin upon which is close enough to the fire to cook the contents of the pumpkin but not to burn it. Which is sometimes impossible.
Rotate pumpkin 1/4 of a turn every 15 to 20 minutes until apples are tender inside. It will take 2 hours or more for this to cook if you want the apples soft. Be sure to cook the apples in very thin slices if you need for it to cook faster. Make sure you try to keep a very ask under the pumpkin this will help it to cook without burning the flesh of the pumpkin.
These can also be baked in a conventional oven. Place pumpkin on a baking pan after it is stuffed. Bake at 400* for 60-90 minutes. The stuffing will be bubbly when done.
**This recipe is for One Pumpkin only.

Thank you!!

Thank you to everyone who came out and supported the Harvest Festival at the Blockhouse this past weekend. We are also very thankful to all of our reenactors and volunteers as well as to everyone who worked behind the scenes to plan the event.

And don’t forget, our Old Christmas event will be on January 9th from 5-7pm.

 

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Frontier Harvest Festival – Charlie Brown

Charlie2Our friend Charlie Brown will have his longhunter camp set up at the Harvest Festival and will be ready to demonstrate essential frontier survival skills such as hide tanning and leather work.

 

Make sure you come by the Wilderness Road Blockhouse on Saturday, October 24 from 1-5 to see Charlie as well as several other demonstrators and reenactors. Stay tuned for more information.

Frontier Cooking Workshop Today – FREE Program

10360951_10204918833676478_335118211000169699_nJean Hood will be conducting a Frontier Cooking Workshop at the Wilderness Road Blockhouse from 12-4 today. The program is free of charge and open to the public. Jean will be preparing three sisters stew and fry bread. Come on out and learn about what kinds of food would have been eaten on the frontier in the late 18th century and how they were prepared.